Posts tagged “Documentary

Motoring Elegance – Classic Cars

Fiskens – London’s top classic car dealership. Charming gentleman too. – http://bll.nr/00bbc

My top selection:

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Hero Image – Billionaire.com

Not Superman or Batman i’m afraid.

‘Hero Image’…the term used for images/illustrations/photographs that are placed in the most prominent position to grab readers when they land on a website.

Below are two examples that use two of my photos:

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Stuffed!

Another Billionaire.com article about the rise of Taxidermy that I photographed – http://bll.nr/3fbbc

My top 7 –

Evil Eye – Bird of Prey

Platapus

Bird of Prey

Humming Bird

Monkey Skulls

Swan

Giraffe Skull


Photo Finish! Official Photographs

A collaboration with Shoot DHS and One Tribe TV

A race between two businessmen, who after work, have to be somewhere…but where? Public transport is not good enough! It’s slow and expensive! Go by bike? ….No! They take it to the streets on foot! Fast and agile and can go where cars can’t!

You can also view the video of the shoot here!

So here are my results. Enjoy!

Danny | Shoot DHS

Danny Time Watching!

Weather Watching

Foot Down

Game On!

Neck and Neck!

Jump into the lead!

Exhaustion

Desperation

Desperation

Final effort!

So Close

Photography | Piers Cunliffe Photography

Thanks go to:

SHOOT DHS | Artistic Director

Lee Martland |Photography Assistant

Andy Barnham | Photography Assistant

Toby Russell | Camerman + Editor

Danny and Aaron | SHOOT DHS Models

One Tribe TV | Production Company


Siurana, Climbing in Spain.

A selection of photographs from my recent trip to Siurana, I was asked to capture climbers in the Region de Mont Serrat.

Short video and article to follow soon.

Siurana Guide Book over looking the entrance to Siurana.

Siurana back street to the local climbing

Climber on Unknown 8a route, Siurana

Andrew Gibb, 6c+, Siurana

Resting/Redpointing, Andrew Gibb, 6c+, Siurana

Laurent Moseley, 6c+, Siurana

Chalking, Laurent Moseley, 6c+, Siurana

Shadow of me on abseil photographing.


Updated Website – New Sections!

There are some great new changes to my website. A brand new fashion section, and soon to be filling the spaces are Film, in association with One Tribe TV, Published Work and Projects. Check it all out here – www.pierscunliffephotography.co.uk – So watch this space as I regularly update it!

Feedback would be great! Thanks

Screen Shot of new website!

In Association with One Tribe TV

 


RAKE Boxing Shoot – Outtakes

So a while back I posted about the official RAKE Boxing shoot by photographer Andy Barnham (click here to view post).

Now that it has been published, I thought I would share some of the shots that I liked that got chucked on the editing room floor.

Mackie

Robert

Harry

Noah

Nick

Tom


Yogamaya Von Hippel – Headshot

Headshots I took of Yogi in collaboration with Tim Baker, The Watermill Studio.

Photography | Tim Baker

Assistant | Piers Cunliffe

MUA | Sophie Bee

Model | Yogamaya Von Hippel


Short Depth of Field

Came across this picture in my archives. I was experimenting with my new 70-200mm f.2.8 and was trying to photograph an ant running along a wall. I missed of course, but I like the very very short DOF in this shot.


Test Shoot with Graham

A great friend of mine is round for the weekend and asked if I could show him how to use off camera flash. Absolutley, lets go one better and get out the studio kit. One will do!

I explained about how different shutter speeds with different apertures can affect the outcome. Also, using a higher f.stop can create darker backgrounds or make it look like it was taken at night. Also the use of a reflector can help reduce the harsh moulding created by either the sun or the flash. (depending which side you hold it.) The distance of the flash from the model as well as the distance you are from the model can also have different outcomes. The best way is to experiment…like I did today.

Small amount of post processing to clean up some spots and also added a desaturated feel to some of them.

So here are my results.

Enjoy.

200th | f.29 | ISO 100

200th | f.6.3 | ISO 100

250th | f.29 | ISO 100

200th | f.13 | ISO 100

 

 

 


RAT RACE Adventures | Day 2 | ‘Nine to Five’

Sunday 25th Sept 2011 saw approximately 1000 competitors head down to the RAT RACE event village in Potters Field, London. This was a longer and more challenging race. Done on foot and bikes, the racers had to cover a lot of London. This time I had the car; Cliff drove and I navigated. When we passed Rat Race competitors on their bikes, it was a good opportunity to lean out of the passenger window and capture the action while moving. Communication was key between me and cliff so I didn’t fall out or take out any cyclists.

Alongside the cycling and running, the racers also kayaked, abseiled, climbed and did an assault course.  It was very hard to keep up with the racers, despite having the car, but we had the traffic and congestion to contend with, as well as having to take the main routes and park the car and walk to the checkpoints where the challenges were taking place.

One of the highlights was that the BBC were filming Ben Fogle competing in the race. He is currently filming a series, in conjunction with Lonely Planet, ‘A Year of Adventures’ and RAT RACE was included. There have been many books about a year of adventures, but this is the first time that it will be televised. Lucky for Ben as he gets to compete/complete all these adventures, something that I would love to do. The BBC were very helpful as they were our big clue to finding Ben and tracking him down. They did have three camera crews, two in vans and third on a motorbike. Also with Ben was another competitor who had eyes on him the whole time, feeding back to the camera crews where they were and where they were next headed. I did ask if I could jump onboard with the team, but unfortunately they didn’t have enough room, or that was a polite way of saying ‘no’. I think it was the latter!

Anyway, here is my selection of photos, while Ben was an interesting focal point, my brief was to capture the RAT RACE, and so I shall present it that way too. (I am never easily starstruck!) Enjoy!

Rat Racers plan their route on maps in front of the Gherkin.

Waiting is always the worst part.

Shot from a moving car. I missed, but I still like it.

Grit and Determination!... and the urge to help haul him up by his beard. Good restraint on my part.

Bungee jumper. Taken from the cage above the Event Village.

Ben Fogle

Rat Racer

Jogging

Well....I did say smile...and I got one!

The kayak challenge


Cotswold Airshow 2011 – aka Kemble

Father’s Day was happily spent with my dad at the Kemble airshow. A spectacle of roaring engines and sultry acrobatics. One day I will be up there with them taking the photos, but for now I had my feet firmly planted on the ground with the lens pointed up. I wanted to keep away from the classic shots of the plane filling the frame against the sky. This way you can great details of the plane but I wanted to put things into perspective. The planes were flying low and the crowds were in awe. We had the last ever UK public display by the DC3 and the 60th anniversary of the Hawker Hunter. So I hope you enjoy them!

Model Breitling Biplane with fully functioning model wing walkers

Red 6 pushing to rejoin the group leader

Model Breitling Biplanes being 'taxied' to the runway

Plethora of lenses at the ready!

An air cadet gets the best seat in the house as the Red Arrows return to front of crowd

Smoke on!

The Red Arrows rolling over Kemble ATC

The last ever UK public display from the DC3. A member of the public hangs his head as he says goodbye!

Another onlooker says goodbye to the DC3

Hawker Hunter on take off!

3 Hawker Hunters fly into the huge cloud formations.

They all gave me quizzical looks!

An Enthusiast


ABF Soldier’s Challenge – The Abseil.

On Saturday 26th March I went to London to help with the abseil challenge at the Oval cricket ground. Arrival was at 9am and we quickly set to work with sorting out the gear – gloves, belay plates/fig 8, harnesses, helmets, ropes and more. Safety was paramount and we all had an hour’s run through on how to rig the releasable abseil, safety line and how to rescue someone. We all split into smaller groups with at least one fully qualified member to run through it with us again. It was a great opportunity to learn new skills and new rope rigging systems.

We were told approximately 1000 racers would come through the abseil challenge and we had to operate 10 lines at any one time. I was fortunate to be allowed to shoot while working which is very rare as some people only want you to concentrate on one element of the day! I had in mind a short photo documentary about what our role was like as a safety supervisor on the event. Below is my story. If you read further down there are some photos from the official RandR photographers of me working. Thanks go to Charlie Summers (photos of me monkeying around) the other RandR photographer (sorry can’t remember your name), Ian Wilson for allowing me to shoot from the best position – on abseil! Thanks to Gaz for teaching me new valuable skills and the rest of the team for a fab day!

Behind The Lens

So you’ve seen my results from my perspective but how did I get into position? Most of the shots are from the top next to the lower off points and this allowed me to get the social shots, but to get the action shots I had to do what the racers were doing – abseiling! This involved setting up a separate point for me to lower off as it could not interfere with the racer’s anchor points. Using a releasable abseil anchor (so I could be rescued in the unlikely event of an accident) with overhand knots and half hitches, backed on a bight and carabiner, I was able to lower myself on my own Gri-Gri.

The simple shots were from the side of the building, parallel with the racers, but I wanted to get a new perspective. Branching out from the main wall that everyone was abseiling down were the support beams for the exterior wall. These 15meter long beams provided the answer, but getting out to its furthest point proved tricky as the beams were round and walking on them would have been stupid, not to mention dangerous, because if I fell I would have swung back into the wall that my rope was fixed to. So I had to fix myself below the beams with larks-footed slings which tighten and grip around the beam when loaded, keeping me fixed in position. But this caused another problem! While the slings were weighted I couldn’t move and getting my weight off the slings was hard too as I was dangling in space. The only way to progress along the beam was to wrap my legs and arms around it and slide along upsidedown while pushing the slings along with me! It all sounds very complicated, but in the end it worked and I was always safe while moving. Very important!

Now I was in position I could commence shooting! It was great fun and the photos below (thanks to Charlie Summers) show me getting into position.